Tuesday, March 15, 2011

Thinking of Cherry Blossoms


You may have noticed the change in the scenery. Japan is on my mind and Cherry Blossoms are blooming early here.
The Cherry Blossom is a short-lived flower. As such, it symbolizes the ephemeral nature of life. It blooms, it wilts, it falls to the ground. On one hand, this seems tragic. But it is also what makes it special. We appreciate it more because we know how fragile and fleeting it is. The events in Japan have had the same effect on me. I have never hugged my children tighter.
They say Japan moved eight feet nearer to the United States, but I think the shift was greater than that. The disaster has brought the world closer. Our shores may not have been hit by the waves, but our hearts are flooded with compassion.
Cherry blossoms bloom, wilt, and fall to the ground.
Then it blooms again.
With our help, so will Japan. 

30 comments:

kellyhashway said...

I couldn't agree more.

C.M. Villani said...

Admirable sentiment, Sam – I feel so bad for the Japanese people. The earthquake and tsunami were bad enough now they have to deal with a possible multiple nuclear reactor meltdown? It’s the worst nightmare scenario imaginable. God save them. 

Serendipity's Library said...

Lovely post. I have been considering a trip to the Cherry Blossom festival in Washington DC. The blossoms are so beautiful and fragile. Even after they wilt and fall from the trees they inspire such elegance.

KLZ said...

I think this is the best thing I've read on Japan in days. The whole situation rends my heart - but cherry blossoms remind us that there is hope.

MuMuGB said...

Lovely picture! Just like you I think of the tragedy all the time. I hope, as you say, that the disaster has brought the world closer. Let's work at it, even at a small scale...

Kate Evangelista said...

I dream of walking along Cherry Blossom-lined streets. And you're right, I've never hugged my loved ones tighter or said "I Love You" nearly enough.

ocmominmanila.com said...

Unfortunately, we didn't get to see them in bloom when we were there. But I just know someday we will go back to Japan again =) And when we do, we'll be 8 feet closer to Hawaii.

Brynne said...

All plants need water, sun and fertilizer to bloom to their potential and as far as I can tell, right now, love is the best fertilizer---among ourselves and sent across the Pacific.
lovely post. thank you.

Joy Page Manuel said...

Beautifully said, Sam.

(Florida) Girl said...

Cherry blossom trees are magical, aren't they?

So sad about Japan.

Samantha Sotto-Yambao said...

Kelly - Let's hope that the world really works together on this.
Christina - It really seems like too much for one country to handle. Praying hard for them.
Serendipity - Thank you. I can't think of a more elegant flower. :)(If you get the chance to go, please take lots of pictures!)
KLZ - Hope is a choice :)
MuMuGB - Yes, I hope we can sustain awareness and interest in helping Japan. Every little bit helps!
Kate - My daughter asked me if God made the tsunami. Sigh. It's so hard to explain things like this to little ones.
OCMom - So happy you guys got home in time. (And I knew I could rely on your humor to lighten the mood! :D). p.s. I loved the post you did on your blog about Japan. :D
Brynne - Absolutely! And love is hopefully the seed of action :)
Joy - Thank you :) (I had to write something down - or I'd burst...)
Florida Girl - Indeed. They're like little poems - each with a large message of hope :)

Janel said...

I'm watching the news right now. I so want to see Japan reblossom as soon as possible. My heart goes out to all of the people that were affected, both physically and mentally.

Jennifer Hillier said...

Lovely post, Sam. :)

Samantha Sotto-Yambao said...

Janel - I wish there was a fast forward button for this. Sigh.

Jennifer - Thank you :)

Self Care Girl said...

I was fortunate enough to be in Japan for 3 weeks in February (although I missed the blossoms-drat!) A beautiful place with just really fabulous people. I am heartbroken over this whole disaster.

Will watch for you book- glad to have taken this slight detour to your site!

Here via Hop a little Tuesday Blog Hop.

I hope you will stop by and check out my self care blog too!

Take Good Care!
Self Care Girl

http://www.myselfcareblog.blogspot.com

Meredith said...

Great post, and I love the new background. The whole Japan situation is just devastating.

Elizabeth Young said...

A beautifully written post and background for an extremely difficult time. Thank you for capturing something I wanted to say but didn't know how to.

Samantha Sotto-Yambao said...

Thanks, Meredith. As long as people care, there's hope :)

Thank you, Elizabeth. It's my little prayer for Japan :)

Cathy Kozak said...

Lovely.

Stacey said...

I am definitely following you back! Your blog background makes me wish it was summer! I can't wait!

Samantha Sotto-Yambao said...

Thanks, Cathy :)

Hi, Stacey! Welcome to the blog *hands over a cupcake* :D

WynnieBee said...

Beautifully written Samantha - I am positive that Japan will rise up again even stronger.

M Kathy Brown said...

I love that you've surrounded this page with the blossoms, and I love how you've expressed what has and is happening in light of what will be.

I do indeed believe, as you, that this has brought our world closer together - closer than what we may at first think.

As Katsumoto said in "The Last Samurai," about the cherry blossoms: they are... all... perfect. That is how I see Japan coming through out of all this - beautiful, like that cherry tree of perfect blossoms.

Kathy

Donea Lee said...

Thanks, Samantha- for such apt, lovely sentiment. I have a distant cousin who lives in Japan. North of where most of the damage was, but luckily something made her book a last minute trip to Utah before the quake hit. My prayers go out to all and i'll keep my fingers crossed that the nuclear situation there is fixed soon and hurts nothing and noone. :)

Jenn said...

Lovely post. Every time I turn on the news, there seems to be a new, terrible situation developing. Thanks for offering a shred of hope.

Samantha Sotto-Yambao said...

WynnieBee - Thank you. I think it's so important to stay positive even in the worst of times :)

Kathy - Thank you! (I remember that scene too! I couldn't agree more) :)

Donea - Thank you. I'm glad your cousin is safe! :) The nuclear situation is indeed a VERY scary one. Japan needs our prayers and help more than ever now.

Jenn - Thank you. I find myself taking a (very) deep breath every time I turn on the news now. Very scary situation indeed, but no matter how dark and frightening things seem to get, we must always choose to hope. :)

(Florida) Girl said...

This is off the subject.

When you get a chance I would love your advice on professional editing services. Everything I read these days says you need one before you start submitting your manuscript. I currently have 4 beta readers critiquing my manuscript while I make efforts to polish it up.

Samantha Sotto-Yambao said...

Hi, Florida Girl! I don't have any experience with professional editing services. I had two beta readers: my mom and my hubby. I do believe in the value of having a fresh eye look at your work, but since I have never used a professional editing service, I can't say that the route is a "must have" for getting published. (As far as I know, none of my writer friends who've published books have used such a service either.) But I will say that the process of editing the book myself really helped prepare me for the revisions I went through with my editor. I'm sorry I can't provide more insight into this.

Best of luck with whatever you decide. Please feel free to drop me a note if you need help with anything else (sam@theslightdetour.com) :D

Katherine Jenkins said...

Beautiful, beautiful post and this is so much of what I needed to hear. Thank you!

Samantha Sotto-Yambao said...

Thank you, Katherine! We all need to find some hope during this time :)